5 Health problems you’re not young

About a week ago I noticed that I was feeling fatigued for no reason on a regular basis. Coffee no longer worked not to mention 3 clients in their 30s said they were restless and didn’t know what to do.  This led me to get a physical which would never have crossed my mind in my 20s.
after the physical the doctor had a talk with me about age and proper rest and burning the candle at both ends and my need to take a daily multi-vitamin. i remember once upon a time I could work two jobs and attend 2 parties a night without a 2nd thought. here are a few things to keep a lookout for as you approach 30 and get to a part of your life where rest and multi-vitamins are a must.
1. Loss of bone strength
Women develop about 90 percent of their bone mass by age 18 and will never have the opportunity to build bone mass after age 30. In fact, starting at 30, you’ll lose about 1% of it per year — good times. It’s super-important to keep what you’ve got by drinking milk and eating kale, almonds, sardines, broccoli, tofu, cheese,  yogurt, and other calcium-rich foods.
2. Heart disease
Heart disease is the number-one killer of women. The good news: You can control risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, cholesterol, diabetes, weight, and physical activity. Heart attack symptoms include shortness of breath and unexplained fatigue.
3. Diabetes
Women who have had gestational diabetes, which affects 2 to 10 percent of American pregnancies, have a higher lifetime risk for Type 2 diabetes. Hypertension, high cholesterol, and obesity is a dangerous combo (commonly known as “metabolic syndrome”) and can be a precursor to diabetes. Get at least 150 minutes of moderately strenuous exercise a week. The origins of [metabolic syndrome] are almost always present in people in their 30s.
4. Cancer
The lifetime breast cancer risk for any woman is 10 percent, and the lifetime colon cancer risk is 6 percent. Annual mammograms are recommended once you hit 40. And while you don’t need a colonoscopy until you’re 50, you may want to start a decade earlier if an immediate family member had the disease.
5. Mental illness
Your exposure to “adverse childhood experiences” — such as physical and emotional abuse, your parents’ divorce, and family substance abuse — can predict many future problems, including anxiety, depression, and alcoholism. If women have predispositions to mood disorders, they do tend to get worse with aging.

 

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